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New app Mix’d connects music lovers based on favorite artists and upcoming events

Dancing Astronaut - EDM, trap, techno, deep house, dubstep

As festival season stretches to nearly twelve months a year, it seems every industry outside of music is looking for a way to cash in. App developers in particular have been meeting needs – or creating demands – before, during, and after festivals. With the bulk of festival and electronic concert attendees falling under Millenial categorization, it’s no wonder that Tinder-esque dating apps, like Glance and Tastebuds.fm, are a solid percentage of the new apps designed for music lovers making waves. The latest to join the music-dating category is called Mix’d. The app connects people based on their stated music choice and concerts that they’ll be going to.

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To use the app, users create a profile with their favorite artists and upcoming concerts that they’ll be attending. A “daily batch” of other geographically proximate users, who like the same artists or are going to the same shows, is available for viewing each day. Like Tinder, if two users swipe right on each other they’ll be entered into a chat. Beyond chatting, matched users can also invite each other to concerts, play music within their conversation, and add other friends to chat and make group concert meet-ups.

The app is available for download in the Apple App Store.

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New app Mix’d connects music lovers based on favorite artists and upcoming events was posted by Lucy Davidson, and appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.

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Panasonic to relaunch legendary Technics turntable line

Dancing Astronaut - EDM, trap, techno, deep house, dubstep

If there is one piece of gear that can be attributed to the historic rise of DJing, it’s the Technics 1200. More than 30 years since its inception, the classic SL-1200MK2 model is still the most revered turntable around. In fact, the signature series can still be found in most nightclubs, finding its place among more modern mixing gear such as Pioneer’s CDJ-2000 line.

While Panasonic ceased manufacturing the turntable in 2010, the Japanese electronics company announced last September that they would be officially relaunching the Technics brand. At their annual IFA press conference in Berlin this year, Panasonic unveiled an early prototype of the re-conceptualized Technics turntable. With a minimalistic, aluminum build, the DJ-friendly direct drive turntable is being rebuilt from the ground up for a more modernized take on the classic.

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While there are no confirmed details as to when the product is expected to hit market, it’s a momentous bit of news for the analog world.

Via: Wired Magazine.

Photo Credit: Panasonic

Panasonic to relaunch legendary Technics turntable line was posted by Michael Sundius, and appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.

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Spotify sets sights on eliminating ‘freemium’ and introducing a ‘gated access’ model

Dancing Astronaut - EDM, trap, techno, deep house, dubstep

Possibly in preparation to equalize the playing field between the two obvious leaders of the streaming pack, Spotify is reportedly looking to move in the same direction as Apple Music by switching to a gated, non-freemium model.

Though no official statement has yet to be released about the change for the platform, it is said that Spotify is considering an “exclusive” approach to paid users, meaning that certain releases might only be available to Spotify subscribers and other methods to entice free users to sign up for a premium account.

A source told Digital Music News that “[Spotify] want the free users to feel like they’re missing something, not just forced to listen to ads.” Additionally, this update comes just a few months after Spotify’s announcement to begin integrate and create video content, another component that could definitely be affected by the platform’s choice to follow a gated access model.

Via: Fact Mag

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Spotify sets sights on eliminating ‘freemium’ and introducing a ‘gated access’ model was posted by Valerie Lee, and appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.

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UK High Court deems iTunes illegal in country

Dancing Astronaut - EDM, trap, techno, deep house, dubstep

Sometimes law can be highly beneficial; other times, it seems like a bureaucratic nightmare designed to make life more inconvenient. The latter seems to be the case in a recent United Kingdom High Court decision to ban iTunes across Britain. According to judges, iTunes violates copyright laws through providing the ability to upload CDs into a personal music library. Consequently, backing up music to an external hard drive or onto iCloud is also illegal.

“It is now unlawful to make private copies of copyright works you own, without permission from the copyright holder—this includes format shifting from one medium to another.” – British IPO

Furthering the blow dealt to Apple by the High Court, Time Machine, Apple Music, and iTunes Match have also become illegal in the UK. However, consumers need not fret; there have been no known cases of people being taken to court over copying CDs to their personal libraries as of late. It remains to be seen whether or not Apple will try to defend their software in international court.

Via: Macworld

UK High Court deems iTunes illegal in country was posted by Christina Hernandez, and appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.

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Instagram censors the ‘#EDM’ hashtag

Dancing Astronaut - EDM, trap, techno, deep house, dubstep

LA County is (once again) starting its tirade against electronic dance music following news about two deaths at the recent HARD Summer, but now, a surprising social media giant is also taking a stand against the genre – EDM, in specific. Though yet to receive official word explaining why, Instagram has seemingly wiped out all traces of the popular hashtag “#EDM.”

Though other related hashtags still exist (#EDMLife, #EDMLifestyle, #EDMVibes), the overarching tag has been removed. Likely, this move was made by Instagram for a reason that might be similar to the recently removed #curvy hashtag. Regarding the seemingly innocent word often associated with body image, Instagram told Mashable: “[Instagram] did block the hashtag #curvy. It was being used to share content that violates our guidelines around nudity. Please note that the block has nothing to do with the term ‘curvy’ itself.”

Though specifics of the hashtag #EDM have yet to be confirmed, the Instagram Community Guidelines leave plenty of room for interpretation of what could have violated the app’s set rules. From “Follow the Law” to “Photos and Videos Appropriate To A Diverse Audience,” it seems as though dance music might have crossed the line.

However, #drugs and #EDMgirls remain.

Instagram censors the ‘#EDM’ hashtag was posted by Valerie Lee, and appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.

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Three college students have created ‘Instagram for music’

Dancing Astronaut - EDM, trap, techno, deep house, dubstep

The last several years have seen no shortage in content-specific social networking apps. In terms of the type of content being shared within these apps, the medium for photography has seen the most success, with applications like Instagram and Snapchat becoming household names. Amidst this technological influx, we have seen music streaming apps like Spotify and SoundCloud achieve worldwide adoption, but the transition of music into the social media realm as an autonomous entity has thus far been left by the wayside. While most streaming applications allow users to follow their friends and send or repost playlists, They lack the communicative element of a Facebook, Twitter, or Instagram.

Three undergraduate students at Tufts University may have created the solution to properly integrate music into the social sphere. Gabriel Jacobs, Amadou Crookes, and Mario Gomez-Hall launched “Cymbal” in May. At press time, the app has been downloaded “at least 17,000 times,” according to Forbes. Cymbal’s founders describe their platform as “music discovery powered by friends, not algorithms.” Forbes writer Denali Tietjan elaborates upon this notion by breaking down the foundation of the app:

Think of Cymbal as an Instagram for music. The app adopts a simple interface embracing a “less is more” vibe, allowing users to post just one song, illustrated by colorful album art. Like Instagram, Cymbal involves a home feed, personal profile, followers, likes, comments, hashtags and tags. Your Cymbal is your song of the moment–that throwback you’d jam to in your basement in high school, that song your friend’s band just released on SoundCloud. Your home feed, then, becomes an updated playlist curated by your friends, your profile: the soundtrack to your life.”

What makes Cymbal so powerful is the sense of agency that its platform provides the user in regards to his or her “song of the moment.” Whether conscious or sub-conscious, a major factor that drives users to share content via social media is the inherent sense of discovery and ownership over what they’ve chosen to share. Cymbal inextricably links users’ identities with the music they’re passionate about in a way that hasn’t yet been successfully applied.

Tietjan goes on to say, “Even if Cymbal fails to gain Instagram-like success, its 15 minutes of fame will produce long-term dividends for Tufts, which now counts computer science as its most popular major.” Past Cymbal’s unconditional dividends to Tufts, the app’s “15 minutes of fame” spearheads progress in regards to the relationship between music and social media. Regardless of the app’s level of success, the context in which Jacobs, Crookes, and Gomez-Hall have placed music sharing demonstrates that music can be converted into cultural currency in social media in a manner analogous to photography. It’s only a matter of time before Cymbal – or a similar platform – will catalyze music to be as successful in this context as photography has been.

Via Forbes.

Three college students have created ‘Instagram for music’ was posted by Will McCarthy, and appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.

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