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How TomorrowWorld Is Capitalizing On The Evolution Of Dance Music [Editorial]

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Music is very unstable entity. Trends come and go like the seasons, but the ones that can adapt and change are the ones the see their lifespans multiply. Dance music is a very big umbrella with many sub-genres evolving into sizes that could live on for years in the commercial mainstream.

Right now, the dance music landscape is growing at an exponential rate and not only do artists and record labels have to adapt, but with the increase in live events and festivals, they need to adapt at the same rate. Festival lineups have diversified since big room house exploded the EDM movement in America, and Tomorrowland stood as one of the world’s most desired events. When it moved over to America with TomorrowWorld, the Atlanta-based festival spiked in popularity much faster than any other festival because of its international stature due to its mother festival.

Although it had a helping hand, TomorrowWorld must still represent the tastes of the American market to survive just like any other festival. Its meteoric rise in popularity and current stature amongst the top tier of festivals like Ultra and Lollapalooza was not due to luck. It was because TomorrowWorld mirrors the evolution of dance music and continually adapts to trends.


The 2015 lineup has been announced in full and this year may not only be TomorrowWorld’s most impressive year yet, but also its most diverse. From headliners down to the undercard, we can already see that TomorrowWorld looks beyond commercial appeal but into the sub-cultures of dance music. Underground, the bass movement, the tropical movement, live performances, and so much more have spawned followings in the American market of substantial sizes.

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To pick a couple examples, we will look at Thomas Jack‘s tropical house stage, the L!VE stage, and the Future Classic stage. Let’s attack Thomas Jack’s stage first. Tropical house may have had one of the swiftest rises in popularity of any genre. Last year, it was so new to the dance music community when an Australian named Thomas Jack and Norwegian named Kygo introduced the melodious, sun-soaked sounds to the world. Now a year later, Thomas Jack has earned an endorsement from Pete Tong and curates the new wave of tropical talent that will be blowing up in the following months. Giving him his own stage at this year’s TomorrowWorld, the festival looks to feed the genre hunger and make their mark for being one of the first festival’s with an all-tropical stage.

Next, we have the L!VE stage. Live electronic performers have been steadily rising in recent times. Porter has his Worlds show, Rudimental was one of the first, and Big Gigantic pioneered live jazz-dance music. With all of these huge names adopting the live setup as opposed to the typical DJ set, festivals are now creating stages for them to perform. TomorrowWorld will have their first live performance stage ever this year with Terminal West Presents L!VE, and this marks yet another example of TomorrowWorld’s mirror of dance music.

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Lastly, the Future Classic stage has yet to announce any of its lineup but the fact that an Australian label made the trip to TomorrowWorld says something. The Australian scene has become one of the most innovative and refreshing scenes for dance music, and Future Classic is a home for many who have pioneered and cultivated it. Flume’s future bass sound has gone viral, Chet Faker is an indie sensation, Ta-ku is a prime example of music’s boundary-less nature. We don’t know who will be there, but we do know that TomorrowWorld is looking all over the world for the next big thing.

All in all, these three example only scratch the surface of how TomorrowWorld mirrors the evolution of dance music. Its success demonstrates exactly why it is one of the most highly regarded festivals in the world, and it has only been in existence for 3 years. Don’t sleep on it, just head down to Chattahoochee Hills, Georgia, this September for TomorrowWorld 2015.

The post How TomorrowWorld Is Capitalizing On The Evolution Of Dance Music [Editorial] appeared first on EDMTunes.

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Why Jerry Folk Is On The Cusp Of His Big Break

Jerry Folk
Four Hype Machine #1’s. Millions of plays on both his remixes and original production. A funk-infectious style. Jerry Folk is an act you want to watch in the coming months because he is about to hit his big break.

Not too long ago, the deep house train began plugging along, picking up fans along its course. Producers were using the calmer atmosphere of what was inspired by the underground to present a commercially attractive style that was fresh and new compared to that of the dying big room scene. The big room fans were getting old of same horn blaring, synth-shattering drops over and over just with different notes. And thus, the deep house found its entry point.

Many sub-genres grew massive followings like tropical and future house, but Jerry Folk seemed to have a different plan. First seeing the spotlight with his remix of Jill Scott’s “Day Dreamin’,” his second remix to surface rode the initial wave of tropical house – before it was “cool.” His Syn Cole remix flirted with a groove-straddles guitar riff. Over the year and a half his career has been afloat, he has evolved his sound and discovered the balance of innovative production and  signature style that many have a difficult time finding.

Folk has remixed a wide variety of genres from old school disco on the Fugees to the indie stylings of Oh Wonder to the R&B classic from Baby Bash. His remix capabilities have no boundaries and this bodes well for his future in the original game.

Jerry Folk has only released one original, “So Long,” with singer BB Diamond. A glossed bassline underneath a string-touched synth melody, Diamond’s vocals begin innocently tender. As the tension builds throughout, she breaks out of her shell to show off the soul brooding within her vocal capabilities. If you listen closely outside of BB Diamond’s voice, every single part works on its own but has its own place with in the track: the synths, the bassline, the resonating drums, the brisk claps, the hi-hats.

So you ask, why is Jerry Folk on the cusp of his big break? The tender-aged producer has already conquered the remix game before exiting his teenage years, and he is proving to do the same in the original game. “So Long” wasn’t a groundbreaking effort by the young Norwegian, but it was exactly what he needed to do to transition into originals. He showed the world his mastery of hip-shaking basslines and disco-tinged melodies to demonstrate consistency. The people got what they expected from the remixes, but now, Jerry Folk has the stage to do what he wants and show the world what he really can do in the studio.

His remix path has showed to have twists and turns with yet an underlying sound laced within them. He kept a consistency but was able to experiment to see what people want, and we anticipate him to keep impressing us in the future. If you haven’t followed Jerry Folk yet, please do yourself a favor and head over to his SoundCloud page to educate yourself.

The post Why Jerry Folk Is On The Cusp Of His Big Break appeared first on EDMTunes.

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A Modern Day Woodstock: Mysteryland USA’s Promising Future

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Every festival has its own personality. Ultra is revered for its setting in the heart of Miami. Coachella is the sophisticated festival in the desert where celebrities can be seen left and right. Tomorrowland is a fantastical world themed with magical scenery that feels like it was taken out of childhood fairytale. But, Mysteryland is an entirely different festival experience that prides itself on being a Culture and Arts festival, transcending the usual music festival.

Music and art festivals have been around for decades. It just wasn’t until the explosion of EDM and the dominant role of social media that people were exposed about the superfluous amount of festivals that are available at a click of a mouse. But, what the dance music culture is looking for is that one festival that defines this generation. The one festival that is the millennial Woodstock.

Woodstock is without a doubt one of the most legendary festivals ever. In the farm country of upstate New York, 400,000 young attendees left their daily lives behind to watch over 30 acts perform in a carefree environment. From the Grateful Dead to Jimi Hendrix to Janis Joplin, the lineup for Woodstock was stacked for 1969, and the 3-day event quickly became the turning point for the rock n roll era. Electronic music is currently looking for its Woodstock.

Every person will argue a different festival is dance music’s Woodstock, but none of them can confidently say that it was a turning point in the scene. Some festival’s have been around for 10+ years and are still looking to be the greatest. Here’s an argument in favor that Mysteryland’s USA edition could become our Woodstock.

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First, Mysteryland has been the oldest dance music festival in the Netherlands. Started back in 1993, it has hosted the world’s most influential DJ and live acts of each year, and continually pushes the boundaries. Second, its expansion to the USA only occurred last year, but after its first edition, the festival is now one of the most anticipated events of the summer. The first year boasted a lineup of Kaskade, Moby, Dillon Francis, and many more premier acts, with tens of thousands of people flocking to the legendary Bethel Woods Center where the original Woodstock was held. Many struggled to book one major headliner for their first year, but Mysteryland was able to attract a handful of them and more popular support acts.

Finally, the lineup for this year’s Mysteryland is absolutely breathtaking. Their headliners include Empire of the Sun, Diplo, Porter Robinson, Kygo and Dillon Francis, but it is the diversity of the entire roster is what truly stands out. The event promoters are clearly a forward-thinking group, with the array of underground acts that the festival boasts from Richie Hawtin to Maceo Plex to the Legendary Josh wink to Matthew Dear and Adam Beyer both hosting their own stages. Beyond the main stream and underground tastes, Mysteryland accommodates almost any fans’ tastes with a plethora of artists in the spheres of trap, future funk, tropical house, deep house and more.

Yes, Mysterland does take place on the legendary grounds of where Woodstock made history, but the festival looks beyond just the location to make their mark on this generation of music. Only in its second year and already delivering the most innovative artists that have pioneered what electronic dance music is today, Mysteryland’s future is promising. Are they the Woodstock of this era? No one can say for sure, but Mysteryland’s ability to go beyond the public’s expectations puts them in the front running.

The post A Modern Day Woodstock: Mysteryland USA’s Promising Future appeared first on EDMTunes.

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A Modern Day Woodstock: Mysteryland USA’s Promising Future

 photo 49b75905-34c7-4c81-bd64-0d0e144f7452_zpsbgpopyxm.jpg

Tickets

Every festival has its own personality. Ultra is revered for its setting in the heart of Miami. Coachella is the sophisticated festival in the desert where celebrities can be seen left and right. Tomorrowland is a fantastical world themed with magical scenery that feels like it was taken out of childhood fairytale. But, Mysteryland is an entirely different festival experience that prides itself on being a Culture and Arts festival, transcending the usual music festival.

Music and art festivals have been around for decades. It just wasn’t until the explosion of EDM and the dominant role of social media that people were exposed about the superfluous amount of festivals that are available at a click of a mouse. But, what the dance music culture is looking for is that one festival that defines this generation. The one festival that is the millennial Woodstock.

Woodstock is without a doubt one of the most legendary festivals ever. In the farm country of upstate New York, 400,000 young attendees left their daily lives behind to watch over 30 acts perform in a carefree environment. From the Grateful Dead to Jimi Hendrix to Janis Joplin, the lineup for Woodstock was stacked for 1969, and the 3-day event quickly became the turning point for the rock n roll era. Electronic music is currently looking for its Woodstock.

Every person will argue a different festival is dance music’s Woodstock, but none of them can confidently say that it was a turning point in the scene. Some festival’s have been around for 10+ years and are still looking to be the greatest. Here’s an argument in favor that Mysteryland’s USA edition could become our Woodstock.

 photo 10255734_505198102913764_7694594442612614743_n_zpsvhg74ocw.jpg

First, Mysteryland has been the oldest dance music festival in the Netherlands. Started back in 1993, it has hosted the world’s most influential DJ and live acts of each year, and continually pushes the boundaries. Second, its expansion to the USA only occurred last year, but after its first edition, the festival is now one of the most anticipated events of the summer. The first year boasted a lineup of Kaskade, Moby, Dillon Francis, and many more premier acts, with tens of thousands of people flocking to the legendary Bethel Woods Center where the original Woodstock was held. Many struggled to book one major headliner for their first year, but Mysteryland was able to attract a handful of them and more popular support acts.

Finally, the lineup for this year’s Mysteryland is absolutely breathtaking. Their headliners include Empire of the Sun, Diplo, Porter Robinson, Kygo and Dillon Francis, but it is the diversity of the entire roster is what truly stands out. The event promoters are clearly a forward-thinking group, with the array of underground acts that the festival boasts from Richie Hawtin to Maceo Plex to the Legendary Josh wink to Matthew Dear and Adam Beyer both hosting their own stages. Beyond the main stream and underground tastes, Mysteryland accommodates almost any fans’ tastes with a plethora of artists in the spheres of trap, future funk, tropical house, deep house and more.

Yes, Mysterland does take place on the legendary grounds of where Woodstock made history, but the festival looks beyond just the location to make their mark on this generation of music. Only in its second year and already delivering the most innovative artists that have pioneered what electronic dance music is today, Mysteryland’s future is promising. Are they the Woodstock of this era? No one can say for sure, but Mysteryland’s ability to go beyond the public’s expectations puts them in the front running.

The post A Modern Day Woodstock: Mysteryland USA’s Promising Future appeared first on EDMTunes.

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Armin Van Buuren on a new world order for EDM; ‘If something is beautiful and if something is great, then it’s just beautiful and great.’

Dancing Astronaut - EDM, trap, techno, deep house, dubstep

Throughout the span his lengthy career, Armin van Buuren has achieved more awards, accolades and acclaim than is worth counting. From a Grammy Award nomination to a record five-time run as DJ Magazine’s No. 1 DJ, van Buuren has (whether intentionally or not) achieved legend-status and carved out a permanent place for himself in the electronic history books.

Everybody’s heard all of that a thousand times already – even van Buuren himself is a little weary of acknowledging his deification. To him, the days when he looked to artists like Tall Paul and Judge Jules for advice and inspiration in the ’90s and early 2000′s don’t seem so far off at all. He still remembers the first time he experienced the power a DJ could hold over an audience from behind the decks.

“I remember seeing Paul Oakenfold at Creamfields and people chanting his name like I’d never heard before. It was really kind of a new thing, so I was really blown away by the whole atmosphere and everything that was happening.”

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Even though that kind of overwhelming response has become a common occurrence for the Dutch producer, he admits that it still gives him goosebumps. “You can get used to a lot of things but you cannot get used to that. It’s a totally surreal feeling, that’s the only appropriate word,” he says. And he means it, too, with that very honest and even endearing modesty Armin exhibits whenever anyone makes him out to be anything other than mortal. Even days before several headlining WMC performances, he’s smiling, excited and quick to poke fun at the whole EDM superstar thing.

The secret to his success, both personally and professionally, is simple: he’s never let anything – not money, fame, status or pressure - get in the way of what he still incontestably considers his greatest and most sacred responsibility: making and sharing music.

“I think at the end of the day the only thing that really matters is the music and the feeling it evokes, the passion you get from it. It’s so great to have an idea for a track and to go into the studio and to create that track, and then actually see that track connect with the audience, to see that they understand you,” he says, his eyes lighting up as he tries to define the sensation. “You speak a new language, you put your emotion into music, not into words, and just the simple melodies, the notes…can spark the same emotion with other people.”

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According to van Buuren, that feeling is why his career has never really felt like a job, but rather more of a life calling.

“I’m the kind of artist who wants to be heard, at the end of the day. I’m an addict to this job, to this work. I really love what I do and I’m passionate about it, but it goes beyond a passion, it goes beyond a hobby or just a way of living. Even if I wouldn’t get paid for it, I would still be doing this.”

While he’s still a producer and performer first and foremost, van Buuren has fallen into a new role over the years: that of a mentor to aspiring producers. It’s a role he embraces wholeheartedly, and one he considers part of the natural order of things, so to speak.

“When I started my career I had help from other people. Now I’m helping new people, and I think that’s the way it should go,” he says. “And I tell these new people – I told W&W as well – now it’s your job to find new talent and to help them further.” And in a culture that is quick to turn artists into idols, sometimes that help includes a nudge in the right direction and a slice of humble pie every now and then. “What I love about young people is that they’re naive in some ways, and sometimes you need to be naive,” he says, smiling wistfully as though lost in some memory from his own youth.

The most common obstacle he sees facing young producers is pressure – pressure to stand out and be the best in the shortest span of time, pressure to play as many gigs as possible in order to be seen or to pay the rent. It’s a foreign attitude to van Buuren, who maintains the only thing you cannot mix with music is money.

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“It’s not going to work,” he says, simple as that. “If you have to make a remix or a follow-up track to pay rent, the pitfall is there and you’ll often end up going for the easy way. You think, ‘well that worked last time so I’ll use the same kick drum, the same bass line, I’ll use the same chord structure…I’ll change the break down a little bit but the drop will be the same.’ And if you don’t have that pressure of having to perform you might be able to give yourself some more creative freedom and say, ‘you know what, I’m just going to throw out all the sounds that I had in my old hit and I’m going to start completely from scratch.” Nearly two decades in the business and van Buuren admits he still doesn’t do well with deadlines. “I’d rather just sit in the studio and have fun because basically that’s what making music is all about.”

Regardless of what he’s working on and with whom, one of van Buuren’s primary objectives is to always remain very aware of the changing musical landscape. The father of two says he hopes his children grow up in a world that is open-minded to the evolution and merging of styles.

“There’s a big irony in the way that humans are made. If you go to the supermarket and you want to buy peanut butter, you go to the aisle where they have the jars of peanut butter. You’d be pretty upset if you came home with a jar that said ‘Peanut Butter’ only to open it and find jam inside. That is a little bit what’s happening with music,” he says. “If you go on Beatport, everything is neatly labeled. Everything is deep house, or trance, or progressive…but the nature of music is that it keeps evolving. And that sort of conflicts with the fact that us human beings, we make Top 40s and we have charts and we have competitions so we can label stuff, so we can put stuff in brackets and in jars and put ‘Peanut Butter’ on them. But if something is beautiful and if something is great, then it’s just beautiful and great.”

[soundcloud url="https://api.soundcloud.com/tracks/197926687" params="color=ff5500&auto_play=false&hide_related=false&show_comments=true&show_user=true&show_reposts=false" width="100%" height="166" iframe="true" /]

For many reasons, he says, music needs that freedom to just be in order to continue evolving. It needs to borrow from other styles, like trance borrowed from progressive and progressive borrowed from minimalism. Van Buuren’s recent collaboration with Mark Sixma was inspired by this concept of flux. Titled “Panta Rhei,” the tune owes its namesake to an old Greek saying from the philosopher Herclitus. “What he meant by that is that if you stand in a river all night, the next day you’re in the same spot but it’s different water running past your legs because the river’s moving,” he explains.

“That’s what happens with music. Everything flows.

 

 

Armin Van Buuren on a new world order for EDM; ‘If something is beautiful and if something is great, then it’s just beautiful and great.’ was posted by Amanda Mesa, and appeared first on Dancing Astronaut.

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Snowglobe Should Be the NYE Festival on the Top of Your Bucketlist

Snowglobe
Lake Tahoe, California’s Snowglobe Festival has seen some pretty extensive growth since it’s inaugural 2011 event. Fusing incredible music and a unique mountainous, winter-wonder-land atmosphere, Snowglobe stands as one of the most intimate and ‘charming’ New Years Eve events in the US. 2013 was a year to remember for sure,  but this 2014 edition was a sight to behold. Attendance has consistently grown from the 30,000+ attendees of 2011, and 2014 was the biggest yett; the sold-out three day extravaganza hosted huge live acts, most notably from Porter Robinson & Odesza, with Flume ringing in 2015 like a boss.

Looking at their recap video alone would prove just how far they’ve come, and it gives a glimpse at what we can expect in the future. And trust us, you can expect a lot. So let’s just take a moment, and take a look at what they’ve done.

First things first. We all know about Coachella’s famous Sahara tent. Sahara tent? Who needs the Sahara tent when you have the Sienna Tent.

Snowglobe

The Sienna tent is where some of the most memorable magic goes down. ODESZA’s performance (as pictured above) was an excellent set of electronic pop fusion, with a warmth and ambiance capable of making you forget all about the cold.

Snowglobe

While ODESZA took to the Sierra tent, Porter Robinson set the mainstage ablaze with an incredible live performance. This was his first “announced US festival where he’d be performing his live set,” and it didn’t disappoint. The live setup was refreshing to say the least, and provided a set with soundscapes unlike any other performance on the 2014 lineup. You can check out fan videos of it on YouTube to try and relive the #SNOWSTALGIA.

Snowglobe

If the music wasn’t enough to warm folks up, Snowglobe has them covered with happy hour on drinks. A legitimate happy hour! It even ran all day long on day 3. We all know how event drinks can be substantially more expensive than what we want to pay, so having them priced down to more humane levels just shows a little bit more about how these guys are all about you and your experience – not the money.

Snowglobe

Come to think of it, Snowglobe’s team isn’t just about providing you with the best experience possible, but the workers and artists as well. We don’t mean the DJs and musicians (because that should be a given at any fest), nah we’re talking about all the art installations and the hard working local artists behind them.

“Here at SGHQ, we’re committed to supporting the arts in every capacity — not just music.”

Snowglobe

Be it cardboard decor from Cardboard Safari, a film project from Honora, or large scale installations like ‘Casita Roma’ (go read up on this traveling surrealist piece, it’s pretty impressive), they’ve got it all covered.

This three day event has something for everyone. It’s got the music, it’s got the natural backdrop and beautiful snow, the cheap alcohol, incredible art from local and traveling artists, and most importantly: the NYE countdown. Everyday is special, but Snowglobe benefits over numerous other events from having their last day on NYE, so you’re destined to leave with memories that will stay with you forever. As mentioned earlier, Flume kicked 2014 out the door and welcomed 2015 in with an insane set, and you can catch a glimpse of it on video – though it’s not really to the same affect as being there…obviously.

We gush about this event because it really is one of the most sincere and charming festivals out there. It’s not rooted with a long history, yet it’s managed to explode in popularity and quality in very short period of time. Artists weather the cold just as the crowd does, and there is a sense of a true community; for those three days, everyone dances and sings together in a real life snow-globe together. It’s a home away from home, and escape to a wonderland of music and friends. Which when you think about it, is exactly what the big league festivals like EDCLV and Tomorrowland (or World) are known for, and that’s exactly why we see Snowglobe doing nothing but becoming more and more successful as time goes on.

You can check out their recap videos on their YouTube channel, and check out their extensive photo gallery on Facebook, both of which we highly recommend you do. Nothing wrong with getting hype for NYE 2015 already!

 

The post Snowglobe Should Be the NYE Festival on the Top of Your Bucketlist appeared first on EDMTunes.

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